Cornell University

Michele Williams : Teaching

My courses focus on the psychological and sociological processes that influence individuals and groups in the workplace. I teach two core courses, "Introduction to Organizational Behavior" (ILROB 1220, a large 200 student course) and "Advanced Micro Organizational Behavior" (ILROB 7210, a foundational Ph.D. course). I teach an elective negotiation course both at the graduate and undergraduate levels ("Negotiation and Conflict Resolution" ILROB 5790 and "Organizations and Negotiation" ILROB 4790). In addition, I teach a course on Women in Management and Entrepreneurship both at the graduate and undergraduate levels (ILROB7750/6750/4750).

As reflected in the student comment below, I take an interactive, experiential approach to teaching the concepts and frameworks associated with organizational behavior.

"I thoroughly enjoyed your lectures throughout the semester. The aspect I liked most was how every lecture related the concepts and ideas we read about to real world situations. In addition, I genuinely liked the variety of the readings, activities, and assignments we go to do. It was nice to be tested and challenged in many different ways, and it kept your class exciting and fun to attend throughout the entire semester. I especially liked the structure of your class, how we learned and discussed a lot of organizational behavior concepts, and then at the end we got to participate in a negotiation simulation and actually practice applying the organizational behavior skills we learned. It is honestly the first time in my educational experience, where I have not simply memorized information from a textbook and then regurgitated it back on an exam or some other written assignment. Your exams, papers, projects were fun yet difficult as they forced me to critically think about what I had learned and apply them to my own life or other real world applicable scenarios. I truly enjoyed this constant aspect of your class."

-(ILROB1220, undergraduate)

Current Semester - Fall 2014:

Office hours: by appointment

ILROB 5790: Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (Fall 2014)

Provides understanding of the theory and the processes of negotiation as practiced in a variety of organizational settings. The course is designed for relevance to the broad spectrum of bargaining problems faced by the manager and the professional. It allows students the opportunity to develop negotiation skills experientially and to understand negotiation by using analytical frameworks. General topics include distributive bargaining, integrative negotiations, psychological biases, sources of power, and multiparty negotiations. Advanced topics include dispute resolution, emotionally intelligent negotiations, and team on team negotiations (e.g., union-management, mergers). Simulations, exercises, role playing, and cases are emphasized.

ILROB 6750 / 4750: Women in Management, Leadership and Entrepreneurship (Fall 2014)

The purpose of this course is three-fold: 1) to examine literature on women in management, leadership and entrepreneurship 2) to develop the ability to use different feminist perspectives to evaluate research on gender in organizations and 3) to apply both traditional research on gender and feminist perspectives to problems facing organizations. We will first review the literature on women in management, leadership, and entrepreneurship. We will then cover a blend of classic and contemporary feminist perspectives on organizations to understand the evolution of feminist thought in the field of OB and to analyze how both traditional and feminist approaches can inform research and practice.

The major goals of this course are to provide students with 1) an overview of gender research in the field of organizational behavior 2) to increase their understanding of how different feminist perspectives can inform research and practice 3) to support them in generating new questions, models and/or frameworks that can be used by organizations.

Graduate Courses

ILROB 7750 / NRE 5120: Feminist Theory in Management, Negotiation, Leadership and Entrepreneurship (Spring 2014)

The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) to examine and understand feminist theory and empirical research in the field of micro-organizational behavior, i.e., management, negotiation, leadership and entrepreneurship and 2) to develop the ability to use different feminist perspectives to evaluate and generate papers that examine gender and gender differences organizations. We will first review classic literature related to gender differences in skills and preferences from the areas of behavioral economics, leadership, negotiations and entrepreneurship. We will then cover a blend of classic and contemporary feminist theory and empirical research to understand the evolution of feminist thought in OB and to analyze literature on gender in management, leadership, negotiations and entrepreneurship.

The major objectives of this course are to provide seminar members with 1) an overview of gender research in the field of organizational behavior 2) to increase their understanding of how different feminist perspectives can inform this research and 3) to support them in generating new theoretical questions, models and/or frameworks.

ILROB 5790: Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (Fall 2014)

Provides understanding of the theory and the processes of negotiation as practiced in a variety of organizational settings. The course is designed for relevance to the broad spectrum of bargaining problems faced by the manager and the professional. It allows students the opportunity to develop negotiation skills experientially and to understand negotiation by using analytical frameworks. General topics include distributive bargaining, integrative negotiations, psychological biases, sources of power, and multiparty negotiations. Advanced topics include dispute resolution, emotionally intelligent negotiations, and team on team negotiations (e.g., union-management, mergers). Simulations, exercises, role playing, and cases are emphasized.

ILROB 7210: Advanced Micro Organizational Behavior (Spring 2015)

Examines the historical development of psychological theories of organizational behavior and contemporary issues in micro organizational research. Emphasizes reading and analysis of primary source material.

Undergraduate Courses

ILROB 6750 / 4750: Women in Management, Leadership and Entrepreneurship (Fall 2014)

The purpose of this course is three-fold: 1) to examine literature on women in management, leadership and entrepreneurship 2) to develop the ability to use different feminist perspectives to evaluate research on gender in organizations and 3) to apply both traditional research on gender and feminist perspectives to problems facing organizations. We will first review the literature on women in management, leadership, and entrepreneurship. We will then cover a blend of classic and contemporary feminist perspectives on organizations to understand the evolution of feminist thought in the field of OB and to analyze how both traditional and feminist approaches can inform research and practice.

The major goals of this course are to provide students with 1) an overview of gender research in the field of organizational behavior 2) to increase their understanding of how different feminist perspectives can inform research and practice 3) to support them in generating new questions, models and/or frameworks that can be used by organizations.

ILROB 1220: Introduction to Organizational Behavior

Introductory survey course of theory and research on individual and group processes (including personality, motivation, communication, leadership), as well as structural and economic forces (including organizational design, power relations, inter-organizational ties, social norms and laws) that shape the contemporary workplace.

ILROB 4790: Organizations and Negotiation (Spring 2015)

This introductory course provides understanding of the theory and the processes of negotiations as practiced in a variety of organizational settings. It is designed for relevance to the broad spectrum of bargaining problems faced by team members, managers, and professionals. It allows students the opportunity to develop negotiation skills experientially and to understand negotiation by using analytical frameworks. General topics include: distributive bargaining, integrative negotiations, psychological biases, and multiparty negotiations. Advanced topics include: sources of power, dispute resolution, emotionally intelligent negotiations, team on team negotiations (e.g., union management). Simulations, exercises, role-playing, and cases are emphasized.