Cornell University

Book Information

Debating Rationality
Nonrational Aspects of Organizational Decision Making
Jennifer J. Halpern (Editor); Robert N. Stern (Editor)


Cloth, 1997 ISBN: 978-0-8014-3378-8
$ 68.95   £52.95

Debating Rationality is a terrific collection of essays written by an obviously first rate set of scholars. Several recent books have attempted to make similar points, but this volume pushes the ideas in new directions, rather than simply restating what are now established themes.-Roderick M. Kramer, co-author of Trust in Organizations Decision makers strive to be rational. Traditionally, rational decisions maximize an appropriate return. The contributors to this book challenge the common assumption that good decisions must be rational in this economic sense. They emphasize that the decision-making process is influenced by social, organizational, and psychological considerations as well as by economic concerns. Relationships, time pressure, external demands for specific types of performance, contractual expectations, human biases, and reactions to unfair treatment alter the decision-making context and the resulting decision outcomes. Contributors: MAX BAZERMAN, Northwestern University JOEL BROCKNER, Columbia University COLIN CAMERER, CalTech JOHN S. CARROLL, MIT ROBERT GIBBONS, Cornell University JENNIFER J. HALPERN, Ithaca, New York DAVID KRACKHARDT, Carnegie Mellon University ALFRED MARCUS, University of Minnesota JUDI MCLEAN PARKS, Washington University ZUR SHAPIRA, New York University FAYE L. SMITH, University of Missouri-Kansas City JOHN STERMAN, MIT ROBERT N. STERN, Cornell University LEIGH THOMPSON, Northwestern University KATHLEEN VALLEY, Harvard Business School BATIA WIESENFELD, New York University OLIVER WILLIAMSON, University of California, Berkeley

About the Author
Jennifer J. Halpern was formerly Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University. She made the economically irrational decision to be an at-home parent. Robert Stern Professor of Organizational Behavior at the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University.

Subject Areas
Sociology
Economics & Finance